A Changing Conversation

Stomp your feet. Bang the drums.  Shout from the roof tops.  I do believe the conversation about mental health is finally changing.  Slowly, people are beginning to talk and write about the mental health world and all of its issues.  There are blogs in which people write about their own experiences with a mental health issue.  There are blogs that present academic treatises about mental health issues.  There are television shows that contain segments about the topic.  There are ads on television and in print that speak to the issue of medication that could help someone with a mental health malady.  Those ads are right up there with the ads about aspirins, tampax and adult diapers.  It is exciting to see the news coverage about mental health.  It is exhilarating to read the many articles that are now being written about mental health issues.  It is downright fantabluous that people are beginning to talk about their own experiences with mental health issues.  Our population is waking up to the fact that mental health issues are a part of the string of illnesses that effect many people.  Mental illness is diagnosable and treatable, and it is no different in its essence than diabetes, and therefore should not carry any stigma with its diagnosis.  A once verboten subject of conversation, the mental health issue has found its way into our more conventional airwaves and cyberwaves.  In short, more people are talking about and thinking about the world of mental health issues.

The Today Show, a very mainstream morning program, covers mental health topics regularly.   Whether one watches the program live or heads to the Today Show website, one will find topics about PTSD therapy dogs, men and depression, and the onset of autumn blahs, just to name a few subjects.  The topics are treated respectfully, and people are always encouraged to seek professional help if they exhibit any symptoms discussed or have questions.  Readers and watchers are also told that mental illness is diagnosable, treatable, and medical in nature.  It is not a figment of the mind.

Online, conversations are being started and projects are being initiated with regard to mental health issues.  Plug into your browser the words “mental illness stigma” and your search will lead you to a number of sites providing hours of reading.  Some of the writing is very academic, but a lot of it is personal.  People are openly sharing their challenges with this illness.  The resulting knowledge creates better understanding.  And the conversation continues to expand every day.  Join the conversation.  Share your stories.  Talk.

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